05.02.19 | Dr. Strangelove

Or… How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

Two years after the Cuban Missile Crisis, Stanley Kubrick’s masterful comedy / satire captured the zeitgeist of the day - our worst nuclear fears and the MADness of Mutually Assured Destruction. You all know the story – an insane general triggers a path to nuclear holocaust that a War Room full of politicians and generals frantically tries to stop.

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04.18.19 | Annie Hall

Winner of the top four Academy Awards of 1978, Woody Allen’s comedic masterpiece is a brilliantly observed film about the intricacies and nuances of human love and relationships.   Annie Hall brought a level of sophistication and intelligence to the comedy genre that has rarely been seen.  Woody Allen expanded traditional storytelling to use a variety of techniques that broke traditions of narrative and style – to illuminate the foibles of human attraction, flirtation and romance – unlike any other film before or since.

I watched it last week for the first time in over 20 years and it still amazes me.

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03.21.19 | Pan's Labyrinth

Before his film, The Shape of Water broke new ground for fantasy films, Guillermo del Torro made Pan’s Labyrinth – a dark, brilliantly conceived fantasy that intertwines the real world of fascist Spain in the years following the Spanish Civil War with a mythical world centered in an overgrown, abandoned labyrinth deep in the forest.

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03.07.19 | Godfather II

Within the current climate of our country and the whirling controversies, investigations and hearings that are dominating our consciousness, Francis Coppola’s stunning portrait of a crime family, descending into its shadow takes on new and vital relevance.

Nominated for eleven Academy Awards, winner of six – this film is one of the most perceptive, incisive explorations of human drive, power and greed and the lengths to which one man will go to protect and maintain his dynasty.

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02.21.19 | Shoplifters

Winner of the Palm d’Or at last year’s Cannes Film Festival, Shoplifters is the new, hauntingly beautiful film by Hirokazu Kore-eda. It is Japan’s Foreign Language entry In the Academy Awards.

This remarkably observed film about a poor family and the simple magic they share is very similar to Roma, stylistically, and (in my humble opinion) equal to that film’s artistry. This is a work of great emotional delicacy by a master filmmaker in full command of his art. 

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02.07.19 | Persona

Expanding the boundaries of our experience of pure cinema, we are running one of Ingmar Bergman’s masterpieces, Persona.
 
This psychological drama has been called the Mount Everest of cinematic analysis – the pinnacle of film’s exploration of the psyche.
 

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01.17.19 | Monsoon Wedding

In 2017 IndieWire named this film the best romance of the 21st Century.  Mira Nair’s film of the romantic entanglements during a traditional Punjabi Hindu wedding in Delhi is a brilliantly colored feast for the senses.  It is one of those joyous films that leaps over national boundaries to celebrate universal human nature.   Balancing five love stories, “Monsoon Wedding” won the prestigious Golden Lion as the best film at Venice in 2001 (among many other awards) and is the kind of film where you meet characters you have never been within 10,000 miles of, and feel like you know them at once.

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01.03.19 | Roma

Awarded the “best film of 2018” by most of the film critics in the U.S. (incl. New York, L.A., Chicago, Seattle, Boston, Kansas City, North Carolina, et. al.) – ROMA finds writer -director Alfonso Cuaron (“Y tu Mama Tambien”, “Gravity”) in complete, enthralling command of his visual craft – telling the most powerfully personal story of his career.

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12.20.18 | Fairy Tale

In keeping with the Holidays, we are screening one of the most enchanting films ever made about the magical innocence of childhood – and how it enlivens our spirit into adulthood.   With brilliant performances by Peter O’Toole as author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Harvey Keitel as Harry Houdini. This is a rare gem of a film and a gift for the holidays.

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12.06.18 | The Descendants

Set in the lush paradise of the Hawaiian Islands, The Descendants is a sometimes humorous, sometimes tragic journey for Matt King (George Clooney) an indifferent husband and father of two girls, who is forced to re-examine his past and embrace his future when his wife suffers a boating accident off of Waikiki. The event leads to a rapprochement with his young daughters while Matt wrestles with a decision to sell the family's land handed down from Hawaiian royalty and missionaries. -- 

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11.15.19 | Sideways

Sideways: Alexander Payne – the brilliant director of “About Schmidt” and “The Descendants” – made this insightful film about two men “growing up” on a journey through the vineyards of Santa Barbara.  “Sideways” will whet your appetite for good wine, cheese and assorted finger food, to be served before and at intermission on this first nite of our recurring Foodie Film and Feed Nights at the Highland.  Winner of the Academy Award for its Screenplay, Critics’ Choice and Golden Globe Award for Best Picture. 

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10.18.18 | Amy

The riveting and tragic story of one of the most talented vocalists in history. Winner of the Academy Award for Feature Length Documentary. 

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10.04.18 | Man On Wire

Using actual footage from the event seamlessly mingled with new re-enactments, filmmaker James Marsh masterfully recreates high-wire daredevil Philippe Petit's 1974 stunt: performing acrobatics on a thin wire strung between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center. Plotting his feat like a master cat burglar, Petit enlists the help of a motley group of friends as he calculates every detail, from acquiring building access to stringing up the wire, and manages to pull off an astounding crime.

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